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jj009 Offline



Beiträge: 4.373

12.08.2018 06:03
when the Vikings travel to Carolina? Thats still probably too soon, but I dont think Minnesota can realistically wait any longer Antworten

Just when you thought it was safe to head to the beach or watch some tennis during the summers last long weekend, the NFL reminded you on Saturday morning that its phones never turn off. The Eagles and Vikings consummated a fun, fascinating trade just days before the season begins, with Philly sending starting quarterback Sam Bradford to Minnesota for a 2017 first-round pick and a conditional fourth-round pick in 2018. Its a remarkable turn of events for a pair of teams with two of the more intelligent and aggressive general managers in all of football. In both their cases, though, we can see just how the rules for quarterbacks and the rules for decision-making at all other positions are entirely different.Vikings general manager Rick Spielman has done an incredible job building a deep, young roster in Minnesota, mostly sticking to what would count as NFL personnel best practices. Hes built through his lines, tried to amass extra draft picks by trading down and mostly stayed out of free agency. When hes veered from those principles in the past, hes avoided making the mistake again. The notable example there is when he traded up in 2013, sending second-, third-, fourth- and seventh-round picks to New England to draft Cordarrelle Patterson, with the Patriots using the selections to acquire Jamie Collins, Logan Ryan?and LeGarrette Blount, Blount coming via trade.Since then, by my count, Spielman has made 10 draft pick-for-pick trades. Eight of them were trades to move down. He traded the 240th pick to move up eight spots in the sixth round of this years draft, about as modest of a trade-up as you can imagine, while his other trade up was at the end of the first round for?Teddy Bridgewater. The price was much more amenable -- a lone fourth-round pick -- to make the trade, but the target?was a quarterback. Even if Bridgewater never plays again (and he will), it was one of the few trade-ups which worked.With extra third- and fourth-round picks in the 2017 draft coming his way from the Dolphins, Spielman has made his most curious and aggressive move since the Patterson trade. It tells us a lot about how he perceives his team and their short-term chances to compete and how desperate Minnesota was for a passer. As much as I suggested the Vikings could get by with Shaun Hill at quarterback, its clear Spielman and coach Mike Zimmer dont agree. (Given that theyre watching Hill every day in practice and realize how bad things would be if Hill himself got injured, they deserve at least some benefit of the doubt here.)Hill has been a better quarterback than Bradford by every single statistical measure I can find over the course of their respective careers, including quarterback rating (45.6 for Hill to Bradfords 40.5), but the differences are modest and Hill is eight years older. Bradford should give the Vikings a higher floor than the one they had with Hill, especially given the possibility that Hill might have been injured and the Vikings might have been forced into playing Taylor Heinicke or Joel Stave.Bradford can run an offense similar to the one offensive coordinator Norv Turner ran last year with Bridgewater. The Vikings had a quarterback in Bridgewater who was capable of protecting the football, making accurate short- to medium-distance passes and working with run-pass options. When Bradford is on his game, hes capable of doing all of those things. His interception rate is better than league average. He was executing RPOs or at least showing those sorts of looks on just about every series with Chip Kelly and Philadelphia last season. And Bradfords certainly comfortable checking the ball down, though his completion percentage on passes within 10 yards of the line of scrimmage as a pro is actually below league average (66.5 percent against an average of 69.1 percent).Thats where you start getting into the problems with Bradford.Hes not Bridgewater in terms of his accuracy, as the former Louisville star completed 73.2 percent of his passes in that same 10-yard bracket during his first two professional seasons. Bradford is not going to threaten teams with his feet in even the modest way that Bridgewater has as a pro, limiting the effectiveness of those RPOs. And the former first overall pick is a perennial injury risk himself, having missed 33 of 96 possible starts during his six-year pro career.If there was a ceiling to Bradfords game, maybe this would make more sense, but if Bradford was going to break out, wouldnt it have happened by now? Ive seen suggestions that Bradford elevated his game during the final few weeks of the 2015 season after returning from an injury, but Im skeptical. Bradfords numbers did improve over his final five games -- he completed 67 percent of his passes, averaged 7.3 yards per attempt and threw eight touchdowns against four picks while averaging 286 yards per contest -- but his QBR over that stretch was still a 49.7, which was just below Johnny Manziel for 22nd.Look closer at that stretch and a lot of the gloss wears off. He beat the Patriots in a game in which he threw for 120 yards and the New England special teams self-destructed. He threw for 247 yards and a touchdown against a Bills pass defense missing Stephon Gilmore, their top corner. Bradford went for 368 and two touchdowns against the Cardinals, but it was in a 23-point loss in which Bradford also threw two picks and lost a fumble. He lost another fumble for a touchdown against Washington in a 14-point loss, in a game that needed 56 attempts to get to 380 yards. Bradford finished with 320 yards and two touchdowns (with a pick) against the Giants, who had the leagues fifth-worst pass defense. Its also a five-game stretch amid a six-year career that has suggested Bradfords a below-average starting quarterback. This isnt even a Josh McCown-level flash.McCown is an interesting name to bring up because hes one of the quarterbacks Minnesota likely inquired about in trades. Spielman suggested several days ago that teams were asking for crazy things in return for a quarterback. Given that Cleveland just got a fourth-round pick as part of a swap for punter Andy Lee, it wouldnt surprise me if they asked for much more in return for McCown. Other teams likely felt equally as precious about the likes of Brian Hoyer and Mike Glennon.If that were the case, you can probably figure out how the Vikings contorted themselves into making this trade. If they felt it was absolutely necessary to acquire a veteran quarterback and had to have one by the end of the weekend, Minnesota very well might have thought that it was better to give up first- and fourth-round picks for Bradford than, say, a second-rounder for McCown or Glennon. I dont think that logic is sound or justifiable, but it is comprehensible.The acquisition of Bradford also speaks to the possibility that Bridgewater might not be ready for 2017. Glennon would have been a free agent after the year, while McCown will be 38 and might not be worth keeping around. The same could be true of Bradford, but after this trade, the Vikings have him on a relatively friendly contract. Bradfords cap hit for 2016 is $7 million, and the Vikings basically have a one-year unguaranteed option for Bradford for 2017 at $17 million. If Bradford plays well this year, Minnesota could have franchised him next year for something in the $20 million range, but that would have been guaranteed money. Now they can wait and see how Bridgewaters knee heals. If hes ready, given this market, its fair to say that theyll likely find a trade partner to recoup something from the Bradford deal.As for the Eagles, their second contract with Bradford comes to a premature end. They paid Bradford $11 million in bonuses as part of his two-year, $35 million deal, with $5.5 million of that just hitting Bradfords bank account on Thursday. They incurred the opportunity cost of starting Bradford throughout training camp and the preseason without handing those reps to Chase Daniel or first-round pick Carson Wentz (who probably wouldnt have taken them anyway with his rib injury), but essentially that $11 million paid for first- and fourth-round picks.Most NFL teams would happily pay $11 million for a mid-first round pick if they had the opportunity. (In fact, I wonder whether a team like the Browns might think about signing a veteran quarterback each offseason in the future for the sole intent of trading them in August.) The selection is even more valuable for the Eagles, who are pick-starved after the deal to trade up and grab Wentz. Their first-round pick in 2017, now the property of Cleveland, is likely to be more valuable than the one theyve acquired from Minnesota, but to keep things simple, lets cancel out those two 2017 first-round picks and the fourth-rounder they sent in 2016 for the fourth-rounder theyre getting from Minnesota.Including the Dolphins trade, you can make the argument that Philly got Wentz and what will end up as a fourth-round pick from the Browns for their 2016 first- and third-round picks, a 2018 second-rounder, two players they didnt want (Byron Maxwell and Kiko Alonso) and the $11 million cost of holding onto Bradford. I dont know if thats a good trade, necessarily, but its far more palatable than the Wentz deal in a vacuum.Reports suggest the Eagles will turn to Wentz immediately as their starter if hes physically able to play, which seems aggressive. Wentz has missed most of the past three weeks of the preseason with a hairline fracture in his ribs, limiting his work in practice while preventing him from playing. Wentz suggested he would be ready for Week 1, but why rush him back into the lineup when you paid Chase Daniel $12 million in guarantees for this exact situation? If Wentz isnt physically ready, you run the risk of being forced to bench him for subpar play amid the famously forgiving Philly fan base, which wont do wonders for his reputation. If Wentz had been so convincing as to justify the No. 1 spot before the injury, the Eagles would have been giving him the No. 1 reps then, too. I have to admit that I dont see the harm in giving Daniel a couple of weeks as the starter before turning things over to Wentz permanently when hes physically ready.The same is true for Bradford in Minnesota. Vikings fans surely remember the lone disastrous start of Josh Freeman in purple and white, a Monday night game against the Giants in which Freeman went 20-of-53 for 190 yards while posting a 6.5 QBR. That start came two weeks after Freeman had been signed by the team, leaving him precious days to learn the playbook and Minnesota scheme, let alone develop any timing or rapport with his receivers. Freeman suffered a concussion late in the game and never played again for the Vikings.Bradford cant start in Week 1. It would be even more foolish and a quicker time frame than the one the Vikings gave Freeman, which was itself far too short. Were eight days out from Minnesotas opener at Tennessee and 15 from their home opener against Green Bay, the exact number of his days Freeman had before his start. Do you bring Bradford in then? Could he realistically even be ready? What about the following Sunday, when the Vikings travel to Carolina? Thats still probably too soon, but I dont think Minnesota can realistically wait any longer. Even as you move on to the Giants game in Week 4, hes still going to be learning all of this on the fly as Bradford (and Turner) prepare for each weeks specific matchup.The problem of Bradford being totally unfamiliar with Turner and his new scheme is why I think the most popular argument in favor of this trade doesnt make much sense. Smart people around the NFL have suggested that the Vikings needed to make this trade because they needed to compete while Adrian Peterson is still in his prime, and while I can understand the argument, I dont know how much the deal really helps.When Bradford has played in places where he had months and years to prepare, he hasnt been very good. What is going to click for Bradford in Minnesota (on no notice) which hasnt clicked for him elsewhere? After years of disappointing, as he figures his scheme out on the fly, why would he be any better in Minnesota?If anything, the most plausible outcome is that Bradford plays worse than he has elsewhere. Minnesota made this deal out of desperation to try to ensure a level of certainty at quarterback in an attempt to save their 2016. In acquiring Bradford, the Vikings are likely getting a certainty, but not the one they want. Asics Gel Quantum 360 Hombre . -- Patrick Reed got an early start in golf. Asics Gel Noosa Tri 9 Baratas . Manuel was offered a position the day he was fired. He accepted earlier this week and the team made the announcement Friday. http://www.deportivasasicsbaratas.com/asics-gel-kayano-23-baratas.html . The Swede became the first golfer to win the PGA Tours FedEx Cup and European Tours Race to Dubai in the same season. "It is still taking a little time to sink in what Ive achieved this week as was the case when I won the FedEx Cup but then it just kept getting better and better as the days went on and I am sure this will be the same," he said. Asics Gel Lyte III Rebajas . The return match will take place next Wednesday. Udinese leads Fiorentina 2-1 in the other semifinal. Napoli staged a second-half comeback from two goals down after Gervinhos opener and a stunning strike from Kevin Strootman. Onitsuka Tiger Hombre . Jordan Lynch, the all-purpose Heisman Trophy finalist from Northern Illinois, failed to make it into that exclusive club.MISSISSAUGA, Ont. -- Hes played just five games this year but already Ricky Ray appears to be in mid-season form. The Toronto Argonauts veteran quarterback is third in CFL passing with 1,355 yards despite missing a game due to a knee injury. His 11 TD passes are second only to Saskatchewans Darian Durant (15), and Ray and Durant are the only starters to not throw an interception. But what really stands out is Rays solid 76.4 per cent completion average, which is tops among CFL starters. The 33-year-old Californian has been hot lately, completing 34-of-38 passes (89.5 per cent) for 438 yards with five TDs in his last two starts. "Were just executing pretty well," Ray said following Tuesdays practice. "Obviously the gameplans our coaches give us have been pretty good but were just playing good football all around and thats what happens. "You see a lot of guys have success when all 12 of us are playing together and thats whats happening for us offensively." Thats certainly not good news for the Edmonton Eskimos (1-5), who visit Toronto (4-2) on Sunday. The West Division squad will be minus linebacker JC Sherritt, the CFLs top defensive player last year, who is out indefinitely after recently undergoing successful thumb surgery. "Hes a good player whos all over the field," Ray said of Sherritt. "He makes a difference. "He seems like hes always around the ball, hes just got those football smarts and is always there and makes a lot of tackles. For us, were not too sad about that." After starting the season 1-2, the defending Grey Cup champions have won three straight and outscored their opponents 111-44 over that span. The offence has done its part as Argos starters have completed 55-of-63 passes (87.3 per cent) for 691 yards and eight TDs with no interceptions in those games. Ray was a sensational 19-of-20 passing for 286 yards and two TDs in Torontos 35-19 win over Winnipeg on July 19 before suffering a knee injury. Backup Zach Collaros stepped in and completed 21-of-25 passes for 253 yards and three TDs in a 38-12 victory over B.C. on July 30. Ray returned and hit 15-of-18 passes for 152 yards and three first-half touchdowns in staking Toronto to a 31-3 half-time lead over Montreal on Thursday. He sat the second half after re-aggravating his knee injury. Ray says theres a simple explanation for this success -- familiarity. Ray and most of his offensive teammates are playing their second season under head coach Scott Milanovich. The six-foot-three, 210-pound Ray struggled initially as he learned Milanovichs offence after being dealt to Toronto following nine seasons in Edmonton. After returning from a knee injury Oct. 19, Ray surpassed the 300-yard passing plateau in three of his final five starts, including a 399-yard performance in Torontos 27-20 road win over Montreal in the East Division final. And Ray was a big reason why Toronto captured the 100th Grey Cup, finishing the CFL playoffs completing 69-of-97 passes for 869 yards and five TDs with just one interception. Toronto has a new offensive co-ordinator in Marcus Brady but hes very familiar with Milanovichs offensive approach and schemes. The two worked together as assistants in Montreal before Milanovich took the Argos head job. And it shows, as Torontos offence is tied for second overall with Calgary in TDs with 21 (one behind league-leading Saskatchewan) and is third in scoring (32.3 points per game). The Argos also boast the CFLs second-leading aerial game (305 yards per game)) and are third in net yards (377 per game).dddddddddddd The passing game is a huge part of Torontos offensive success as it leads the CFL in completions (150) and completion percentage (75.8 per cent). By comparison, the Argos ground game is ranked second-last overall, averaging 86.7 yards per game. But in Canadian football an offences success usually begins under centre and Milanovich, a former quarterback, has nothing but praise for Rays play. "Hes playing great football and really has been for about the last 10 games hes played," Milanovich said. "Were just trying not to talk about it too much and let him go out there and continue to do what hes doing. "I think its comfort level with the offence and his progressions . . . hes really feeling and seeing what the offence is giving him. Hes comfortable back there, obviously were protecting well for him, which is huge, and Marcus is doing a nice job calling the game." Theres also an obvious rapport between Ray and his receivers. Chad Owens, the CFLs outstanding player last year, is again leading the league in receiving with 43 catches for 470 yards and a TD. Canadian Andre Durie has 29 receptions for 370 yards and a touchdown while former Eskimo Jason Barnes -- who was released, then re-signed by Toronto last season -- has 16 receptions for 238 yards but a team-high four touchdown grabs. "Its a lot easier when youve been through it one time before," Barnes said. "Everybody understands not only their position but other positions as well so it helps out with our spacing and cohesiveness." Owens agrees. "We were in this system last year and a majority of the same guys are back," he said. "Ricky is comfortable, he understands it and besides that hes just an unbelievable quarterback. "I cant say enough about his poise, how he is in the pocket and his ability to deliver the ball on time and in the perfect spot." And with both Dontrelle Inman and Canadian Spencer Watt both nursing leg injuries, rookie John Chiles has contributed nine catches for 155 yards and three touchdowns. Inman might play against Edmonton and Watt could return soon as well, creating an interesting situation for Milanovich. "All good problems to have and they tend to take care of themselves through injury and other factors," he said. "That becomes a pretty good six-receiver package that maybe you have look into. "Well try to find a way to get all of them on the field, they deserve it." Predictably Ray downplayed Sundays game saying it wont mean nearly as much to him as his first meeting against the Eskimos or even last years East Division semifinal game against Edmonton. Barnes agreed, sort of. "Its another game for us," he said. "But at the same time I know me and Rick always love beating our former team so Im looking forward to it." NOTES: The New England Patriots released former Winnipeg defensive end Jason Vega on Tuesday . . . Montreal signed defensive end Anwar Stewart to its practice roster. The 37-year-old helped the Alouettes win three Grey Cups in 10 seasons with the club and was the CFLs top defensive player in 04. Stewart is also Montreals all-time leader in sacks with 66 but played with Calgary last season. The Als added Canadian receiver Ismael Bamba to their roster, signed defensive end Eze Ibiorato to the practice roster, released receiver Youssy Pierre and put Canadian defensive end Ameet Pall on the nine-game injured list. Wholesale Jerseys Wholesale Jerseys cheap jerseys Cheap Jersyes Cheap Basketball Jerseys Cheap NHL Jerseys cheap jerseys Cheap Jerseys Cheap Jerseys Cheap Jerseys From China Cheap NFL Jerseys ' ' '

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